davey dreamnation

seething since 2001ish

Category: Cordite Poetry Review (Page 1 of 4)

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Work: A Cordite-Prairie Schooner Co-Feature

I’m very pleased to say that Work: A Cordite-Prairie Schooner Co-Feature is now online, and available for your cerebral delectation. But what is Prairie Schooner? And what do I mean by ‘co-feature’? And what the heck is ‘cerebral delectation’ anyway?

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Cordite 37: No Theme! is now online

Cordite 37: No Theme! is now online and features forty new works by a whole bunch of poets who got super-excited by the opportunity to send us poems on any theme they liked. Or else, um, no theme at all.

From the editorial by Alan Wearne:

An editor’s task should be exhilarating of course, if I hadn’t have thought it possessed this potential I would not have said ‘Yes’ to Cordite when approached. The attendant risks of course are very often those of ego, an editor’s true, but particularly of those you reject. How well I recall when as poetry editor of Meanjin under Judith Brett folk would send accompanying letters to the actual editor beginning Dear Sir … Well, since they didn’t bother to check we couldn’t be expected to publish could we? Mind you since a woman was now editor there were a number of female writers who sent in the kind of verse that assumed that Meanjin was now the flagship of sisterhood, mid 80s style. When one contributor received a note from me suggesting that her work might be shown to better effect as a sonnet I received a furious reply lecturing me as to how the sonnet was a patriarchal verse form, this amusing both the editor and myself.

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Cordite 36: Electronica is now online

I’m a bit behind the eight-ball here, but all the same it’s a real thrill to announce that Cordite 36: Electronica is now online!

The issue contains more poetry and poetics than you can poke a stick at. Here’s a run-down:

Cordite 36: Electronica

Guest Poetry Editor: Jill Jones

Contributors: Gemma Mahadeo, Paul Giles, w.m.lewis, michael farrell, Kevin Gillam, Danijela Kambaskovic-Sawers, Christopher Brew, Mark O’Flynn, Anne Gorrick, Misbah Khokhar, Angela Gardner, Greg McLaren, Mark Young, Scott-Patrick Mitchell, Derek Motion, Jessica Wilkinson, Stuart Cooke, Helen Symonds, Joyce Parkes, Sam Langer, Rory Dufficy, Derek Rawson, Gregory Horne, Jenny Powell, Chris Oakey, Louise Molloy, Jessica Bell, Phillip A. Ellis, Eddie Paterson, Joanne Merriam, Christina Armstrong, Susan Adams, Sean M. Whelan and Isnod, komninos, Philip Norton, Pascalle Burton, Emilie Collyer, Mark William Jackson, Ian Gibbins, Jason Nelson, Konrad McCarthy, Joshua Mei-Ling Dubrau, Benjamin Laird, Maxine Clarke, Gareth Jenkins, Crixus, Jamison C. Lee, Sara Moss, Adam Fieled, Bev Braune, Sally Evans, Tim Wright, Alice Melike Ülgezer, David McCooey and Joseph Baron-Pravda.

I’m also happy to say I’ve got a couple or three pieces in the issue, the first of which is Tiny Steps: the Electr(on)ification of Cordite, a reflection on what it means to be ‘electronic’ or not when it comes to online poetry journals.

In addition, and as a reflection of my time spent this year working as part of the ELMCIP project, I’ve published an interview with Maria Engberg and an interview with Talan Memmott. Maria and Talan are my colleagues at BTH in Karlskrona, and it was great of them to spare some time to chat about all things e-lit.

So, enjoy!

Cordite 35: Ozko is (back) online!

Cordite 35: Oz-Ko!

#35.0: Oz-Ko (Envoy)
Contributors: Zenobia Frost, Derek Rawson, Tim Wright, Patrick Jones, David Howard, Emily Stewart, Sue Stanford, Mark Young, Geoff Page, Cassandra Atherton, Shane Macauley (with Hyang Ja), Nöelle Janaczewska, Rhonda Poholke, Fleur Beaupert, Jen Jewel Brown, Anne Elvey, Joe Dolce, Adam Ford, Maggie Shapley and Michael Sharkey.
Poetry Editor David Prater
Released April 2011

#35.1: Oz-Ko (Hoju-Hanguk)
Contributors: David Prater, Sebastian Gurciullo, Barry Hill, Ivy Alvarez, Terry Jaensch, Jane Gibian, Fiona Wright, Jill Jones, Pascalle Burton, Daniel O’Callaghan, Luke Beesley, Michelle Cahill, Corey Wakeling, Liam Ferney, David Stavanger, James Stuart, 
Stuart Cooke, Ouyang Yu, Christine Armstrong, Michael Farrell and Ali Alizadeh.
Poetry Editor David Prater
Released May 2011

#35.2: Oz-Ko (Hanguk-Hoju)
Contributors: KO Un, KIM Kyung Ju, KIM Ki-Taek, KIM Myung-in, KIM Sa-in, KIM Sun-Woo, KIM So Youn, KIM Un, KIM Hyesoon, RA Hee-duk, PARK Ra Youn, PARK Hyung Jun, SONG Kyung Dong, SIN Yongmok, SHIN Hae Wook, SHIM Bo Sun, LEE Seong-bok, LEE Si-young, JIN Eun-young and HWANG Tong gyu.
Poetry Editor Eun-Gwi Chung
Released August 2011

I edited Cordite for ten years, and all I got was this lousy screenshot montage

Still, as far as screenshot montages go, it’s not so bad. Read my post over on Cordite celebrating ten years and 2,000 posts, or check out a slideshow of screenshots at your leisure.

Cordite 35.1: Oz-Ko (Hoju-Hangul)

It’s kind of hard to believe, and in fact I’ve been feeling slightly delirious for the last few days, but I’ve finally managed to put together the second part of Cordite’s Oz-Ko issue devoted to all things Australian and Korean. While the first part of the issue, released in April, was a teaser or Envoy in the form of twenty poems in English, Oz-Ko (Hoju-Hangul) is a full-blown bi-lingual exercise featuring forty new poems in English, and Hangul translations by 김재현 (Kim Gaihyun) and 김성현 (Kim Sunghyun).

Poets featured in this stage of the issue include our three touring Hojunauts (Ivy Alvarez, Barry Hill and Terry Jaensch) as well as a motley crew of contemporary Australian poets including Fiona Wright, Jane Gibian, Jill Jones, Pascalle Burton, Liam Ferney, Michael Farrell, Luke Beesley, David Stavanger, James Stuart and heaps more. In addition, we’ve been assembling a series of features on Australian and Korean poetry and culture, which you can now read at your leisure.

While I’m proud of each of the thirty-odd issues of Cordite that I’ve produced in my time as editor of the magazine, there will always be a special place reserved in my heart for Oz-Ko, no doubt partly because so much of my life has been invested in Korea. Having undertaken Asialink residencies in Seoul in 2005 and 2009, this third visit is really a culmination of all I once hoped to achieve in Korea, and perhaps that’s why I’m now feeling delirious. In any case, it’s a real thrill to see some Hangul finally make its way onto the Cordite site, and I really hope that some Korean readers get to experience contemporary Australian poetry in all its ragged glory.

Speaking of which, I’ve written two editorials for this issue. Well, three actually, if you include the Introduction to Oz-Ko (Envoy). Compared to that, the introduction to Oz-Ko (Hoju-Hangul) is a lot shorter, possibly due to fatigue. But the piece I’m actually really proud of is the Oz-Ko meta-poem I wrote and which features hyperlinks to each of the sixty poems already published in the issue (you can also view the Hangul version here, complete with URLs – don’t get me started on how long it took to format those!). Of course, for some readers I’m sure it will be a case of TL;DR but who cares what they think.

Here’s what I think: that the process of producing this truly bi-lingual issue has been just as important as the contents of the issue itself; that translation in this sense includes not just translation between languages but between electronic formats and systems; that Hangul script looks way cool; that Cordite 35: Oz-Ko is perhaps just the first step of a much larger and longer journey; and that after all this coding, formatting, stressing and navel-gazing, it’s time for a well-deserved soju or two.

David ‘Bek-Ho’ Prater, signing off for now.

Cordite 35: Oz-Ko – let the games begin!

My one sharp-eyed reader will recognise the image to the left as being based on Paju Book City, a photo that featured on this blog last month. I’m not sure why I bothered mentioning that but the fact remains that if you click on that image, you’ll be transported instantly to Cordite 35: Oz-Ko, a special issue devoted to new poetry from Australia and the Republic of Korea.

I’m really excited about this issue, not least because I’m one of the editors but also because in a Cordite first, we’ll be publishing it in stages. Yes, Oz-Ko’s so big that we’ve had to split it up. The first stage includes twenty new poems (an ‘Envoy’ of sorts – read my editorial for a slightly less vague explanation) plus a rolling series of features, beginning with Dan Disney’s passionate article about Ko Un’s Maninbo. Subsequent stages will feature more poems in English and Hangul and much more!

In the meantime, wrap your laughing gear around new poetry by the likes of Adam Ford, Jen Jewel Brown, Anne Elvey, Joe Dolce, Fleur Beaupert, Mark Young, David Howard, Patrick Jones, Tim Wright, Zenobia Frost and, ummmm, ten others! Oh and check back to the site over the coming weeks to check out features by Jackson Eaton, Daniel East, Lara Williams and mooooooooooore!

Ahem. I’ll get me coat.

Children of Malley II

Cordite 34 | Children of Malley II
Poetry Editor | Liam Ferney
Released | 1 December 2010

Starring

Margie Malley, Sally Malley, Ethelred Malley, Blinkie ‘Bill’ O’Malley, Bernie Malley, Nessy Malley, ‘King’ James Malley, Francois Sagat O’Malley, Ern Malvern Star, Walker Norris, Earned, Janice ‘Pearl’ Malley, Aurelia Schober Malley, Ern Malley III, John Malley, Bradley Malley-Trushott, Dodi ‘Dodo’ Malley, Joe Dimalley-o, Chase Malley, Recuperating Malley, Giacomo Mally, Act. Cotton Malley, Penumbra O’Malley, E.V. Malley, A.D. Malley, Omar O’Mally, Jason Silver, Gema de Malley, John Malley, A.R. Malley and Vogel Malley.

Davey sez | Git awn it.

UPDATE (8/12/10): the true identities of at least ten of the contributors to this issue have now been revealed. Check out the action here and here.

UPDATE (6/2/2011): all of the contributors to Children of Malley II have now been exposed as charlatans and fakes. Read more about it here, and see the full list here.

Creative Commons – The Remixes

It gives me great pleasure to announce that Cordite 33.1: Creative Commons – The Remixes is now online, featuring thirty new works inspired by and based upon the poems published in our Creative Commons issue.

Contributing remixers include Lawrence Upton, Nathan Shepherdson, Stuart Cooke, Susan McMichael, Ashley Capes, Corey Wakeling, Chris Beckett, Francesco Levato, Bella Li, Maria Zajkowski, Anne Gorrick, Charles D’Anastasi, Nick Whittock, klare lanson, Rebecca Landon, Josh Mei-Ling Dubrau, Pascalle Burton, Carol Chan, Gillian Cameron, Chris Oakey, Sam Twyford-Moore, Adam Formosa, Stu Hatton, Mariana Isara, Dianne Cikusa and Oritsegbemi Emmanuel Jakpa.

My thanks to guest poetry editor Alison Croggon for her efforts – first in selecting the poems featured in Creative Commons, and secondly for the undoubtedly slightly confusing job of selecting the remixes. For the low-down on Alison’s impressions of the poetry selected in the two issues, read her editorial.

Plus, submissions are now open for Cordite 34: Children of Malley II! Send us up to five poems on the theme of Ern Malley before October 15 for your chance to enter the Malley canon! Get the full details, including a link to the Cordite online submission form!

Cordite 33 is now online!

Now that the major effort is over and the social media sites have been updated it’s time to note, for the benefit of the Dreamnation’s single reader, the release of Cordite 33: Creative Commons.

Our guest poetry editor for the issue is Alison Croggon, and she’s done a great job selecting a bustling swag of new poems. In addition, our features editor Matthew Hall has assembled a stellar collection of essays, interviews and feature articles; and our spoken word editor Emilie Zoey Baker has done the same, selecting six slick audio tracks for your aural pleasure. In further addition there’s the usual assortment of reviews, images, news items and so on and so on. Check it out. Last but not least, we’re now inviting remixes of the issue – get all the DJ details here.

I’m really proud of this issue, not least because I’ve been working overtime on a re-design of the site and while it ain’t perfect, it’s a lot better than our clunky old WordPress default theme mod. That being said, I’d like to pay tribute to afore-mentioned clunky old default theme mod, in the knowledge that from today onwards the only record of its passing will be found within the NLA’s Pandora Archives, and here:

We will never see the likes of it again.

*Sniff*

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